Prospective randomized trial of continuous femoral nerve block with posterior capsular injection versus periarticular injection for analgesia in primary total knee arthroplasty

Prospective randomized trial of continuous femoral nerve block with posterior capsular injection versus periarticular injection for analgesia in primary total knee arthroplasty

Can J Surg 2021;64(3):E265-E272 | PDF

Sanjay Aragola, MD; Benjamin Arenson, MD; Marshall Tenenbein, MD, MSc; Eric Bohm, MD; Eric Jacobsohn, MD; Thomas Turgeon, MD, MPH

Abstract

Background: Femoral nerve block (NB) and periarticular injection (PI) are 2 common options for pain control after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). We performed a prospective triple-blinded randomized trial comparing continuous femoral NB to PI, with follow-up to 1 year.

Methods: Patients younger than 70 years of age who were scheduled to undergo elective primary TKA under spinal anesthesia between 2009 and 2010 were randomly allocated to receive either continuous femoral NB or PI. Patients in the NB group received ropivacaine through an NB catheter and a sham saline PI. The PI group received a PI of ropivacaine, morphine, ketorolac and epinephrine, and a sham saline infusion via an NB catheter. Both groups had standardized oral analgesia preoperatively, spinal anesthesia and sedation, and postoperative analgesia. Surgeons, anesthesiologists, patients and assessors were blinded to group assignment. Pain was measured twice daily on postoperative days 1 and 2, at rest and with motion, with a numeric rating scale. Patient satisfaction, pain (Oxford Knee Score) and range of motion were assessed at 1 year.

Results: There were 39 participants in the NB group and 35 participants in the PI group. There were no statistically significant differences between the groups at baseline. Statistically but nonclinically significant reductions in pain scores on postoperative day 2 and in narcotic need on the day of surgery were found in the PI group. Patient-reported satisfaction did not differ at any time point. At 1 year, knee flexion was significantly greater in the NB group than in the PI group (mean range of motion 120° v. 110°, p = 0.03).

Conclusion: There was no demonstrated improvement in pain control with the use of an NB versus PI when used with multimodal analgesia. Clinicians should opt for the modality that has the best efficiency for their surgical environment. ClinicalTrials.gov # NCT00869037

Résumé

Contexte : Le bloc nerveux (BN) fémoral et l’infiltration périarticulaire (IP) sont 2 options d’usage courant pour maîtriser la douleur après l’arthroplastie totale du genou (ATG). Nous avons procédé à un essai prospectif randomisé à triple insu afin de comparer le BN fémoral et l’IP, avec un suivi allant jusqu’à 1 an.

Méthodes : Les patients de moins de 70 ans qui devaient subir une ATG élective sous épidurale entre 2009 et 2010 ont été assignés aléatoirement à un BN fémoral continu ou à une IP. Les patients du groupe soumis au BN recevaient de la ropivacaïne par un cathéter de BN et une IF simulée (solution saline). Le groupe soumis à l’IP recevait de la ropivacaïne, de la morphine, du kétorolac et de l’épinéphrine et une perfusion simulée (solution saline) par un cathéter de BN. Les 2 groupes avaient reçu une analgésie orale standard avant l’intervention, une anesthésie rachidienne avec sédatifs et une analgésie postopératoire. Les chirurgiens, les anesthésiologistes, les patients et les évaluateurs ne connaissaient pas l’assignation des agents aux différents groupes. La douleur a été mesurée 2 fois par jour aux jours 1 et 2 postopératoires, au repos et à la mobilisation, au moyen d’une échelle numérique. La satisfaction des patients, la douleur (questionnaire d’Oxford pour le genou) et l’amplitude de mouvement ont toutes été évaluées après 1 an.

Résultats : Le groupe soumis au BN comptait 39 participants et le groupe soumis à l’IP en comptait 35. Il n’y avait aucune différence statistiquement significative entre les groupes au départ. Des réductions statistiquement (et non cliniquement) significatives des scores de douleur au deuxième jour postopératoire et du recours aux narcotiques le jour de la chirurgie ont été notées dans le groupe soumis à l’IP. La satisfaction autodéclarée des patients n’a différé à aucun moment. Au bout de 1 an, la flexion du genou était significativement plus marquée dans le groupe soumis au BN que dans le groupe soumis à l’IP (amplitude de mouvement moyenne 120° c. 110°, p = 0,03).

Conclusion : On n’a démontré aucune amélioration de la maîtrise de la douleur avec l’utilisation du BN c. IP avec analgésie multimodale. Les médecins devraient opter pour la modalité qui offre le meilleur degré d’efficience en fonction de leur environnement chirurgical. ClinicalTrials.gov # NCT00869037


Accepted May 11, 2020

Acknowledgements: The authors thank the Academic Oversight Committee of the Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Max Rady College of Medicine, University of Manitoba for financial support of this study. The authors also thank Drs. Colin Burnell and David Hedden for enrolling patients in the trial and Dr. Amir Esmail for assisting in funding and execution of the study.

Affiliations: From the Department of Surgery, Max Rady College of Medicine, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Man. (Turgeon, Bohm); and the Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Max Rady College of Medicine, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Man. (Aragola, Arenson, Tenenbein, Jacobsohn).

Competing interests: Thomas Turgeon reports institutional research support not related to the submitted work from DePuy Synthes, Hip Innovation Technology, Zimmer Biomet and Smith & Nephew. No other competing interests were declared.

Contributors: T. Turgeon, S. Aragola, M. Tenenbein, E. Bohm and E. Jacobsohn designed the study. T. Turgeon, B. Arenson and M. Tenenbein acquired the data, which T. Turgeon, S. Aragola, B. Arenson and M. Tenenbein analyzed. T. Turgeon and S. Aragola wrote the article, which T. Turgeon, S. Aragola, B. Arenson, M. Tenenbein, E. Bohm and E. Jacobsohn critically revised. All authors gave final approval of the article to be published.

Content licence: This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0) licence, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided that the original publication is properly cited, the use is noncommercial (i.e., research or educational use), and no modifications or adaptations are made. See: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/

Funding: This study was supported by the Academic Oversight Committee of the Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Max Rady College of Medicine, University of Manitoba.

DOI: 10.1503/cjs.020519

Correspondence to: T. Turgeon, Department of Surgery, University of Manitoba, 310−1155 Concordia Ave, Winnipeg MB R2K 2M9, tturgeon@cjrg.ca