Trauma simulation in bilingual Canada: Insurmountable barrier or unexpected strength? Insights from the first bilingual S.T.A.R.T.T. course

Trauma simulation in bilingual Canada: Insurmountable barrier or unexpected strength? Insights from the first bilingual S.T.A.R.T.T. course

Can J Surg 2016;59(2):80-82 | PDF

Lawrence M. Gillman, MD, MMedEd; Sandy Widder, MD, MHA, MSc; Julien Clément, MD; Paul T. Engels, MD; John Damian Paton-Gay, MD; Peter G. Brindley, MD

Summary

The Standardized Trauma and Resuscitation Team Training (S.T.A.R.T.T.) course focuses on training multidisciplinary trauma teams: surgeons/physicians, registered nurses (RNs), respiratory therapists (RTs) and, most recently, prehospital personnel. The S.T.A.R.T.T. curriculum highlights crisis management (CRM) skills: communication, teamwork, leadership, situational awareness and resource utilization. This commentary outlines the modifications made to the course curriculum in order to satisfy the learning needs of a bilingual audience. The results suggest that bilingual multidisciplinary CRM courses are feasible, are associated with high participant satisfaction and have no clear detriments.


Accepted for publication Nov. 9, 2015

Affiliations: From the Department of Surgery, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Man. (Gillman); the Department of Surgery, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alta. (Widder, Paton-Gay); the Division of Critical Care Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alta. (Brindley); the Department of Surgery, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ont. (Engels); and the Department of Surgery, Université Laval, Québec, Que. (Clément).

Competing interests: None declared.

Contributors: All authors contributed substantially to the conception, writing and revision of this article and approved the final version for publication.

DOI: 10.1503/cjs.014115

Correspondence to: L.M. Gillman, Z3053 – 409 Taché Ave., Winnipeg, MB, R2H 2A6; gillmanlm@yahoo.ca