Interpretation of surgical neuromonitoring data in Canada: a survey of practising surgeons

Interpretation of surgical neuromonitoring data in Canada: a survey of practising surgeons

Can J Surg 2015;58(3):206-08 | PDF | Appendix

Jonathan A. Norton, MRes, PhD; Keith E. Aronyk, MD; Douglas M. Hedden, MD

Summary

Intraoperative neuromonitoring is a specialized skill set performed in the operating room to reduce the risk of neurologic injury. There appears to be a shortage of qualified personnel and a lack of Canadian guidelines on the performance of the task. We distributed a web-based survey on the attitude of the surgeons to the interpretation of intraoperative neuromonitoring data among surgeons who use the technique. At present, most of the interpretation is performed by either technologists or by the surgeons themselves. Most surgeons would prefer professional oversight from a neurologist or neurophysiologist at the doctoral level. There is a lack of personnel in Canada with the appropriate training and expertise to interpret intraoperative neuromonitoring data.


Accepted for publication Oct. 15, 2014

Early-released Apr. 1, 2015; subject to revision

Affiliations: From the Division of Neurosurgery, Department of Surgery, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatook, Sask., (Norton); and the Department of Surgery, University of Alberta. Edmonton, Alta. (Aronyk, Hedden).

Competing interests: None declared.

Contributors: All authors contributed substantially to writing and/or revising and to the conception and design of the manuscript and approved the final version for publication.

DOI: 10.1503/cjs.013214

Correspondence to: J.A. Norton, Division of Neurosurgery, Department of Surgery, Royal University Hospital, 103 Hospital Dr., Saskatoon, SK, S7N 0W8; j.norton@usask.ca