Medicine versus surgery/anesthesiology intensivists: a retrospective review and comparison of outcomes in a mixed medical–surgical–trauma ICU

Medicine versus surgery/anesthesiology intensivists: a retrospective review and comparison of outcomes in a mixed medical–surgical–trauma ICU

Can J Surg 2013;56(4)275-279 | PDF

James Lee, B Eng, MD Sameena Iqbal, MD Ash Gursahaney, MD Thamer Nouh, MBBS Kosar Khwaja, MD, MBA, MSc

From the Department of Surgery and Critical Care Medicine, Montreal General Hospital, McGill University, Montréal, Que.

Abstract

Background: With various types of complex patients being treated in a mixed medical– surgical– trauma intensive care unit (ICU), we hypothesized that there should be no difference in patient mortality with respect to the core training of the intensivist.

Methods: We reviewed the cases of all patients admitted to a mixed medical– surgical–trauma ICU at a Canadian university teaching hospital in 2007. Patients were assigned to 1 of 2 treatment groups (internal medicine, surgery/anesthesiology) based on the treating intensivist’s training. Our primary outcome was to compare patient mortality in the ICU between the groups. We used generalized estimating equations to determine 10-day mortality after admission to the ICU. A multivariate Cox hazard model was used to determine statistical significance and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for 11- to 60-day mortality in the ICU.

Results: A total of 961 patients were admitted from January to December, 2007. We found no significant difference between the groups in 10-day mortality (odds ratio 0.73, 95% CI 0.46–1.18, p = 0.20) and 11- to 60-day mortality (hazard ratio 1.43, 95% CI 0.62–3.30, p = 0.40) after admission to the ICU.

Conclusion: In a large university trauma centre that operates a mixed medicine– surgical–trauma ICU, there was no significant difference in mortality between patients managed by intensivists with core training in internal medicine and those managed by intensivists with training in surgery/anesthesiology.

Résumé

Contexte : Compte tenu de la variété de cas complexes traités dans les unités de soins intensifs (USI) mixtes de médecine–chirurgie–traumatologie, nous avons émis l’hypothèse selon laquelle il ne devrait y avoir aucune différence en ce qui concerne la mortalité chez les patients selon la formation de base de l’intensiviste.

Méthodes : Nous avons passé en revue les dossiers de tous les patients admis dans l’USI mixte de médecine–chirurgie–traumatologie d’un centre hospitalier universitaire canadien en 2007. Les patients ont été assignés à l’un de 2 groupes (médecine interne ou chirurgie/anesthésie) selon la formation de l’intensiviste traitant. Notre paramètre principal visait à comparer la mortalité des patients des USI selon leur groupe. Nous avons utilisé des équations d’estimation généralisées pour déterminer la mortalité à 10 jours suivant l’admission à l’USI. Et nous avons utilisé un modèle de risque multivarié de Cox pour déterminer la portée statistique et les intervalles de confiance (IC) de 95 % en ce qui concerne la mortalité dans les 11 à 60 jours d’hospitalisation à l’USI.

Résultats : En tout, 961 patients ont été admis entre janvier et décembre 2007. Nous n’avons observé aucune différence significative entre les 2 groupes pour ce qui est de la mortalité à 10 jours (rapport des cotes 0,73, IC de 95 % 0,46–1,18, p = 0,20) et de la mortalité dans les 11 à 60 jours (rapport des risques 1,43, IC de 95 % 0,62–3,30, p = 0,40) suivant l’admission à l’USI.

Conclusion : Dans un important centre universitaire de traumatologie doté d’une USI mixte médecine–chirurgie–traumatologie, on n’a noté aucune différence significative quant à la mortalité entre les patients soignés par des intensivistes ayant une formation de base en médecine interne et les patients soignés par des intensivistes ayant une formation de base en
chirurgie/anesthésie.


Accepted for publication Sept. 17, 2012

Competing interests: None declared.

Contributors: J. Lee, S. Iqbal and K. Khwaja designed the study. J. Lee and A. Gursahaney acquired the data. J. Lee and N. Thamer wrote the article, which S. Iqbal, A. Gursahaney, N. Thamer and K. Khwaja reviewed. All authors analyzed the data and approved publication.

DOI: 10.1503/cjs.005412

Correspondence to: K. Khwaja McGill University Health Centre Montreal General Hospital 1650 Cedar Ave. Montréal QC H3G 1A4 dr.k.khwaja@mcgill.ca