The economic impact of periprosthetic infection in total knee arthroplasty

The economic impact of periprosthetic infection in total knee arthroplasty

Can J Surg 2021;64(2):E144-E148 | PDF

Mina W. Morcos, MD, MSc; Paul Kooner, MD; Jackie Marsh, PhD; James Howard, MD, MSc; Brent Lanting, MD, MSc; Edward Vasarhelyi, MD, MSc

Abstract

Background: Currently, the gold standard treatment for periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is 2-stage revision, but few studies have looked at the economic impact of PJI on the health care system. The objective of this study was to obtain an accurate estimate of the institutional cost associated with the management of PJI in TKA and to assess the economic impact of PJI after TKA compared to uncomplicated primary TKA.

Methods: We identified consecutive patients in our institutional database who had undergone 2-stage revision TKA for PJI between 2010 and 2014 and matched them on age and body mass index with patients who had undergone uncomplicated primary TKA over the same period. We calculated all costs associated with the 2 procedures and compared mean costs, length of stay, clinical visits and readmission rates between the 2 groups.

Results: There were 73 patients (mean age 68.8 [range 48–91] yr) in the revision TKA cohort and 73 patients (mean age 65.9 [range 50–86] yr) in the primary TKA cohort. Two-stage revision surgery was associated with a significantly longer hospital stay (mean 22.7 d v. 3.84 d, p < 0.001), more outpatient clinic visits (mean 8 v. 3, p < 0.001), more readmissions (29 v. 0, p < 0.001) and higher overall cost (mean $35 429.97 v. $6809.94, p < 0.001) than primary TKA.

Conclusion: Treatment for PJI after TKA has an enormous economic impact on the health care system. Our data suggest a fivefold increase in expenditure in the management of this complication compared to uncomplicated primary TKA.

Résumé

Contexte : À l’heure actuelle, le traitement par excellence d’une infection de prothèse articulaire (IPA) survenant après une arthroplastie totale du genou (ATG) est l’arthroplastie de révision en 2 étapes. Toutefois, peu d’études se sont penchées sur les répercussions économiques de l’IPA sur le système de santé. La présente étude visait donc à estimer de façon précise le coût de prise en charge de l’IPA par les établissements, ainsi qu’à évaluer les répercussions économiques de l’IPA après une ATG, comparativement à celles d’une ATG primaire sans complications.

Méthodes : Nous avons recensé, dans la base de données de notre établissement, tous les patients consécutifs ayant subi une ATG de révision en 2 étapes pour une IPA entre 2010 et 2014, puis les avons jumelés en fonction de l’âge et de l’indice de masse corporelle avec des patients ayant subi une ATG primaire sans complications durant la même période. Nous avons calculé tous les coûts associés aux 2 interventions, et avons comparé la moyenne des coûts, de la durée d’hospitalisation, des visites cliniques et des réadmissions entre les 2 groupes.

Résultats : On comptait 73 patients (âge moyen 68,8 ans [plage 48–91 ans]) dans la cohorte d’ATG de révision, et 73 patients (âge moyen 65,9 ans [plage 50–86 ans]) dans la cohorte d’ATG primaire. L’ATG de révision en 2 étapes, comparativement à l’ATG primaire, a été associée à une durée d’hospitalisation significativement plus longue (moyenne 22,7 j c. 3,84 j; p < 0,001), à un plus grand nombre de visites en clinique externe (moyenne 8 visites c. 3 visites; p < 0,001), à un taux plus élevé de réadmission (29 réadmissions c. 0 réadmission; p < 0,001) et à des coûts globaux plus élevés (moyenne 35 429,97 $ c. 6809,94 $; p < 0,001).

Conclusion : Le traitement de l’IPA après une ATG a d’énormes répercussions économiques sur le système de santé. Selon nos données, les dépenses liées à la prise en charge de cette complication pourraient être 5 fois plus élevées que celles liées à une ATG primaire sans complications.


Accepted Mar. 30, 2020

Affiliations: From the Division of Orthopaedic Surgery, Department of Surgery, University of Toronto, St. Michael’s Hospital, Toronto, Ont. (Morcos); and the Division of Orthopaedic Surgery, Department of Surgery, Western University, London Health Sciences Centre and University Hospital, London, Ont. (Kooner, Marsh, Howard, Lanting, Vasarhelyi).

Competing interests: J. Howard reports grants from Stryker and DePuy Synthes, personal fees from Stryker, DePuy Synthes, Smith & Nephew and Intellijoint Surgical, and institutional research support from Stryker, DePuy Synthes, Smith & Nephew, Zimmer Biomet and MicroPort, outside the submitted work. He holds stock in PersaFix Technologies. E. Vasarhelyi reports grants from DePuy Synthes, personal fees from DePuy Synthes, Zimmer Biomet and Hip Innovation Technology, and institutional research support from DePuy Synthes, Zimmer Biomet, Smith & Nephew and Stryker. No other competing interests were declared.

Contributors: M. Marcos, J.L. Howard, B.A. Lanting and E.M. Vasarhelyi designed the study. M. Marcos, P. Kooner, J.D. Marsh, J.L. Howard, B.A. Lanting and E.M. Vasarhelyi acquired the data, which M. Marcos, P. Kooner, J.D. Marsh, J.L. Howard, B.A. Lanting and E.M. Vasarhelyi analyzed. M. Marcos, P. Kooner, J.D. Marsh, J.L. Howard, B.A. Lanting and E.M. Vasarhelyi wrote the article, which all authors reviewed and approved for publication.

Content licence: This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0) licence, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided that the original publication is properly cited, the use is noncommercial (i.e., research or educational use), and no modifications or adaptations are made. See: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/

DOI: 10.1503/cjs.012519

Correspondence to: E. Vasarhelyi, Divison of Orthopaedic Surgery, London Health Sciences Centre, University Hospital, 339 Windermere Rd, PO Box 5339, London ON N6A 5A5, Edward.Vasarhelyi@lhsc.on.ca