The Canadian Ophthalmology Society’s adaptation of the Medically Necessary Time-sensitive Surgical Procedures triage and prioritization tool

The Canadian Ophthalmology Society’s adaptation of the Medically Necessary Time-sensitive Surgical Procedures triage and prioritization tool

Can J Surg 2021;64(1):E48-E50 | PDF

Salina Teja, MD; Colin Mann, MD; Phil Hooper, MD; Yvonne Buys, MD; Vivian T. Yin, MD, MPH

Summary

At the start of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, hospitals and ambulatory surgical centres significantly decreased elective surgical procedures to facilitate capacity for in-hospital beds, preserve personal protective equipment (PPE), preserve anesthetic medications and limit spread of infection. Non-COVID-19–related ophthalmic disease continues to affect vision, and it is anticipated that the backlog of elective surgeries will require months to years to resolve. The delivery of ophthalmic surgical care in a prioritized, systematic and transparent way is vital to manage the surgical backlog while minimizing vision loss and consequent disability in the Canadian population. The Canadian Ophthalmology Society (COS) has modified the published Medically Necessary, Time Sensitive (MeNTS) Procedures scoring system to be applicable to all subspecialties within ophthalmology. This case prioritization process integrates medical necessity, consideration of resource preservation with risk of COVID-19 exposure, and factors unique to eye care. It provides guidance to Canadian ophthalmologists to facilitate decision making in triaging elective procedures.


Accepted Aug. 12, 2020

Affiliations: From the Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Teja, Yin); the Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS (Mann); the Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Western Ontario (Hooper); and the Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Toronto (Buys).

Competing interests: None declared.

Contributors: All authors contributed substantially to the conception, writing and revision of this article and approved the final version for publication.

Content licence: This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0) licence, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided that the original publication is properly cited, the use is noncommercial (i.e., research or educational use), and no modifications or adaptations are made. See: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/

DOI: 10.1503/cjs.012120

Correspondence to: V.T. Yin, Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, 2550 Willow St, Vancouver BC V5Z 3N9, viviany@me.com