Stable rates of operative treatment of distal radius fractures in Ontario, Canada: a population-based retrospective cohort study (2004–2013)

Stable rates of operative treatment of distal radius fractures in Ontario, Canada: a population-based retrospective cohort study (2004–2013)

Can J Surg 2019;62(6):386-392 | PDF | Appendix

Kathleen A. Armstrong, MD, MSc; Herbert P. von Schroeder, MD, MSc; Nancy N. Baxter, MD, PhD; Toni Zhong, MD, MHS; Anjie Huang, MSc; Steven J. McCabe, MD, MSc

Abstract

Background: Rates of surgical management of distal radius fractures are increasing internationally despite the higher cost and limited outcome evidence to support this shift. This study examines the epidemiology of distal radius fractures and asks if the same shift has occurred in Ontario, Canada (population 13.9 million).

Methods: This population-based, retrospective cohort study examined distal radius fractures in people aged 18 years and older over a 10-year period (2004–2013). The incidence analyses were based on the first occurrence of a fracture within a 2-year time period. The number of fractures, age-adjusted incidence rates and frequency of fracture treatment type by year were assessed. We used a Poisson regression with robust standard errors to determine if there was a statistically significant change in the frequency of fracture treatment type over time.

Results: There were 25 355 distal radius fractures among Ontarians 18 years of age and older in 2013. Between 2004 and 2013, the age-adjusted incidence rate for people 35 years of age and older was stable, between 2.32 and 2.70 per 1000 population. Rates of cast immobilization remained stable between 82% and 84%. Of those patients treated surgically, the rate of open reduction and internal fixation rose from 7% in 2004 to 13% in 2013 at the expense of other types of surgical management.

Conclusion: In Ontario, rates of cast immobilization are stable and there has been a movement toward open reduction and internal fixation among patients treated surgically.

Résumé

Contexte : Le taux de prise en charge chirurgicale des fractures du radius distal augmente partout dans le monde, malgré le coût supérieur de l’intervention et le manque de données probantes sur les issues. Cette étude se penche sur l’épidémiologie des fractures du radius distal et cherche à savoir si cette augmentation se reflète en Ontario, au Canada (population : 13,9 millions).

Méthodes : Cette étude de cohorte rétrospective basée sur la population examinait les fractures du radius distal chez les personnes âgées de 18 ans et plus sur une période de 10 ans (de 2004 à 2013). Les analyses de l’incidence étaient fondées sur la première occurrence de fracture en 2 ans. Le nombre de fractures, le taux d’incidence ajusté en fonction de l’âge et la fréquence annuelle des types de traitement des fractures ont été évalués. Nous avons utilisé une régression de Poisson avec des erreurs types robustes pour déterminer s’il y avait des changements statistiquement significatifs dans la fréquence des types de traitement des fractures au fil du temps.

Résultats : Il y a eu 25 355 fractures du radius distal chez les Ontariens de 18 ans et plus en 2013. Entre 2004 et 2013, le taux d’incidence ajusté en fonction de l’âge pour les personnes de 35 ans et plus était stable, entre 2,32 et 2,70 pour 1000 personnes. Le taux d’immobilisation plâtrée est demeuré stable entre 82 % et 84 %. Chez les patients traités par chirurgie, le taux de réduction chirurgicale et de fixation interne est passé de 7 % en 2004 à 13 % en 2013, au détriment des autres types de prise en charge chirurgicale.

Conclusion : En Ontario, le taux d’immobilisation plâtrée est demeuré stable et il y a eu une augmentation de la réduction chirurgicale et de la fixation interne chez les patients traités par chirurgie.


A portion of this paper was presented at the American Association for Hand Surgery Annual Meeting, Jan. 13–16, 2016, Scottsdale, Ariz.

Accepted Jan. 9, 2019; published online Sept. 23, 2019

Affiliations: From the Department of Surgery, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ont. (Armstrong, von Schroeder, Baxter, Zhong, McCabe); and ICES, Toronto, Ont. (Huang).

Funding: Funding was provided by the Physicians’ Services Incorporated Foundation for the collection and management of the data.

Competing interests: None declared.

Contributors: K. Armstrong, H. von Schroeder, N. Baxter, T. Zhong and S. McCabe designed the study. K. Armstrong, N. Baxter, T. Zhong, A. Huang and S. McCabe acquired and analyzed the data and H. von Schroeder also analyzed the data. K. Armstrong wrote the article, which all authors reviewed and approved for publication. All authors agreed to be accountable for all aspects of the work.

DOI: 10.1503/cjs.016218

Correspondence to: S.J. McCabe, Toronto Western Hospital, 399 Bathurst St, 2EW – 422, Toronto ON M5T 2S8, steve.mccabe@uhn.ca