Multidisciplinary in-situ simulation to evaluate a rare but high-risk process at a level 1 trauma centre: the “Mega-Sim” approach

Multidisciplinary in-situ simulation to evaluate a rare but high-risk process at a level 1 trauma centre: the “Mega-Sim” approach

Can J Surg 2018;61(5):357-360 | PDF | Appendix

Nori L. Bradley, MD, MSc; Kelsey Innes, MD; Christa Dakin, MD; Andrew Sawka, MD; Nasira Lakha, RN, MSN; S. Morad Hameed, MD, MPH

Summary

Multidisciplinary simulation has been used to successfully teach crisis resource management in operating room and emergency department settings. This article describes a “Mega-Sim” approach using an in-situ simulation that moves among multiple hospital departments to enhance multidisciplinary training and assess institutional response to a rare but high-risk event: trauma in a pregnant patient. It appears that a Mega-Sim can be used to identify systems issues, increase medical knowledge and improve perceptions of teamwork and communication within and among hospital departments.


Accepted Jan. 22, 2018

Acknowledgements: The authors would like to acknowledge the significant contributions from members of the VGH emergency department, VGH ICU (including the “Code Blue” and critical care outreach teams), VGH operating room, VGH trauma services, and the VGH organization, as well as the Centre for Excellence in Surgical Education and Innovation, BC Emergency Health Services, and the department of maternal-fetal medicine at BC Women’s and Children’s Hospital who were involved in the planning, execution, evaluation and actionable follow-up of this event. The authors also thank the reviewers at Canadian Journal of Surgery, who provided insightful comments to improve this manuscript.

Affiliations: From the Department of Surgery and Critical Care Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Bradley, Hameed); the Department of Emergency Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Innes, Dakin); the Department of Anesthesia, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Sawka); and Trauma Services, Vancouver General Hospital, Vancouver, BC (Lakha, Hameed).

Competing interests: None declared.

Contributors: All authors contributed substantially to the conception, writing and revision of this article and approved the final version for publication.

DOI: 10.1503/cjs.005417

Correspondence to:N. Bradley, UBC — General Surgery, 3100 JPPN 950 West 10th Ave., Vancouver BC V5Z 1M9, nori.bradley@gmail.com