Intraoperative ultrasonography of the biliary tract using saline as a contrast agent: a fast and accurate technique to identify complex biliary anatomy

Intraoperative ultrasonography of the biliary tract using saline as a contrast agent: a fast and accurate technique to identify complex biliary anatomy

Can J Surg 2017;60(5):316-322 | PDF

Abhijit Chandra, MS, MCh; Vivek Gupta, MS; Rahul Rahul, MS, MCh; Manoj Kumar, MD; Ajeet Maurya, MS

Abstract

Background: Intraoperative assessment of biliary tract anatomy is relevant for a number of benign and malignant hepatobiliary diseases. During biliary reconstruction, drainage of all relevant bile ducts is imperative to prevent atrophy of undrained segment, cholangitis and secondary biliary cirrhosis. Intraoperative cholangiography, though widely used for intraoperative imaging of the biliary tract, involves heavy equipment use, radiation risk and has a limited role in the evaluation of isolated segmental bile ducts.

Methods: We evaluated the use of a novel technique of intraoperative ultrasonography of the biliary tract using normal saline as a contrast agent. It involves injecting saline in any part of the biliary system while performing real-time intraoperative 2-dimensional ultrasonography.

Results: This procedure was carried out in intraoperative situations to delineate complex biliary anatomy involving segmental bile ducts. Excellent image quality was obtained in the form of opacification and demarcation of the liver segment to which the duct belongs. The flow of saline microbubbles was clearly visible on real-time ultrasound images, leading to accurate identification of the duct.

Conclusion: Intraoperative ultrasonography with saline as a contrast agent can accurately identify small isolated segmental bile ducts and help in surgery of the biliary tract. It is a simple and inexpensive technique that can be performed with minimal resources.

Résumé

Contexte : L’examen anatomique peropératoire des voies biliaires est justifié pour un certain nombre de maladies hépatobiliaires bénignes et malignes. Durant la reconstruction biliaire, la vidange de toutes les voies biliaires concernées est nécessaire pour prévenir l’atrophie des segments non drainés, la cholangite et la cirrhose biliaire secondaire. Même si elle est couramment utilisée pour l’imagerie des voies biliaires, la cholangiographie peropératoire fait appel à des équipements complexes, comporte un risque d’irradiation et joue un rôle limité dans l’évaluation de segments isolés des canaux biliaires.

Méthodes : Nous avons évalué l’utilisation d’une nouvelle technique d’échographie peropératoire des voies biliaires à l’aide de solution physiologique comme agent de contraste. La technique repose sur l’injection de solution physiologique dans n’importe quelle portion de l’appareil biliaire sous échographie bidimensionnelle peropératoire en temps réel. Nous avons évalué l’utilisation d’une nouvelle technique d’échographie peropératoire des voies biliaires à l’aide de solution physiologique comme agent de contraste. La technique repose sur l’injection de solution physiologique dans n’importe quelle portion de l’appareil biliaire sous échographie bidimensionnelle peropératoire en temps réel.

Résultats : La technique a été appliquée dans un contexte peropératoire afin de cerner l’anatomie biliaire complexe de certains segments des canaux biliaires. Des images d’excellente qualité ont été obtenues sous forme d’opacification et de délimitation du segment hépatique auquel le canal appartient. La circulation des microbulles de sérum physiologique était clairement visible sur les images échographiques en temps réel et a permis de visualiser les structures avec précision.

Conclusion : L’échographie peropératoire avec sérum physiologique comme agent de contraste permet de visualiser avec précision de petits segments isolés des canaux biliaires et facilite la chirurgie des voies biliaires. C’est une technique simple et peu coûteuse qui peut être effectuée avec un minimum de ressources.


Accepted Feb. 21, 2017; Early-released Aug. 1, 2017

Affiliations: From the Department of Surgical Gastroenterology, King George Medical University, Lucknow, India (Chandra, Rahul, Maurya); the Department of Organ Transplant, King George Medical University, Lucknow, India (Gupta); and the Department of Radiology, King George Medical University, Lucknow, India (Kumar).

Competing interests: None declared.

Contributors: A. Chandra and V. Gupta designed the study. R. Rahul and A. Maurya acquired the data, which M. Kumar analyzed. V. Gupta, R. Rahul and A. Maurya wrote the article, which all authors reviewed and approved for publication.

DOI: 10.1503/cjs.011116

Correspondence to: A. Chandra, King George’s Medical University, Department of Surgical Gastroenterology, Ground Floor, Centenary Hospital, Shahmina Rd, KGMU Lucknow Uttar, Pradesh 226004, India; abhijitchandra@hotmail.com